Updates for the t-shirt biz

We just bought a new Digital heat-press machine last Saturday.  We haven’t tested it yet since we still have a printer to buy.  So no t-shirt outputs yet.  We are working on it within the week and we hope to produce sample t-shirts.

The digital heat press machine transaction took about 5 hours since we opted that the merchant teaches us the basics and the fundamentals of t-shirt transfer business.  For reference, we will post the materials in the comment side.

Tasks delegation would be:  I will handle the marketing side.  Jeff will be the finance and Mike will be the operations.  Of course its not done without the output product – we will all be the production workhorse.

Using the Freemind tool, click here for Mike’s todo list.  Click here for mine.

We have updated / created the following for use:

On the side note:

My mixer just arrived last Oct. 17. I was really happy for it.  The transaction was very fast and I didn’t expect it to be – the last time I ordered from the net took more than 1 month to be delivered.  Now, the delivery works wonders – just 1 week.   I tested the Pioneer SE-DJ5000 headset for professional DJ and it wows me – until now I’m exited to test the mixer but I cant since its power input is at 120 volts.  As soon as I find an AVR power regulator, I will test it right away.  Cheers!

Tools for group collaboration

I came across this on the Net. Some cool tools for online group collaboration (that you can use without sitting right next to each other).

  1. Zoho – It’s hard to jump in and describe the best features about Zoho’s vast suite of online editing and group organization tools, because so much changes on a week-to-week basis.  It’s able to handle both the lower-level tasks of group editing, document sharing, and other work, as well as the milestone tracking, group chat, invoice creation, and other tasks needed by teams that aren’t sitting right next to each other. It’s good stuff, and it’s free.
  2. MindMeister – For ideas and projects where drawing a line through your thoughts helps keep them together, MindMeister is a great helper. Not only does their web-based design tool allow for easy branching, notating, and organization, but if you just want to jam in a few ideas to be molded into shape later, it allows for email additions. You can, of course, share, publish, and collaborate on your mental diagrams, and doing so might just save you a really unnecessary phone call or stop-and-chat.

    If you use Freemind like me, this is your online version of it.

  3. DimDim – Makers of “webinar” software are feverishly pitching the idea of at-your-desk conferences as a money-saving alternative to travel these days. DimDim, an open-source meeting platform, offers web users a truly money-saving experience, with up to 20 users able to view a presentation, three of them with microphone access, with no software installations required. It’s a nice step up if you need something a little more professional than a social video chat room, and is surprisingly responsive on freehand drawing, text, audio, and even screencasting across a variety of connection speeds.
  4. Google Wave – an online tool for real-time communication and collaboration. A wave can be both a conversation and a document where people can discuss and work together using richly formatted text, photos, videos, maps, and more.
  5. Google Groups – Groups lets a, um, group of like-minded folks hash out arguments, answer questions, and point to helpful resources without software or constraints. Users of a group can rate posts for helpfulness, search out answers across their own groups or other similar-themed topics, and get their answers and responses delivered from an easily filtered email source. It’s an oft-overlooked tool in an age of fancy-pants social tools, but it gets everyone hooked up and talking pretty quickly.